russian tula submarine

© TASS
Russia’s Tula underwater missile cruiser

The Russian Navy has expanded its strategic capabilities by commissioning a nuclear submarine, three new warships, two helicopters and a number of home-made Kalibr cruise missiles.

“The Navy took delivery of the repaired Project 667BDRM strategic underwater missile cruiser Tula, three warships and support vessels of the auxiliary fleet, two helicopters and 46 Kalibr tactical cruise missiles,” Russian Deputy Defense Minister Yuri Borisov said Wednesday.

First commissioned in late 1980s, Tula is a Delta IV class submarine capable of carrying 16 massive Sineva intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). With a range of over 11,000 kilometers (around 7,000 miles), the missile can deliver four nuclear warheads to its targets after being launched from Tula.

The Russian Navy has also accepted logistics support ship Elbrus built in Murmansk in northwest Russia and was looking forward to the delivery of another batch of seaborne Kalibr cruise missile, Borisov said.

Kalibr missiles are nuclear-capable and can also carry 500 kilograms (1,100 lbs) of conventional explosives in their warhead. Russian military sources say the conventionally armed version has a range of 2,500 km (1,600 miles) while a nuclear armed Kalibr has a greater range of 2,600 km.

Russia retains 2nd place in military-technical cooperation

Meanwhile, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin said Wednesday that his country has remained world’s second in terms of military and technical cooperation despite being subjected to several rounds of sanctions by the US and the European Union.

“Despite the sanctions, the Industry and Trade Ministry and other our structures responsible for the development of the defense sector have managed to keep the high level of military and technical cooperation. We are still in the second place and are retaining this position, despite the illegal sanctions and unfair competition with us on the arms sale markets,” Rogozin said during a meeting of the Industry and Trade Ministry.

According to the vice-premier, the Russian military had fulfilled a record 97-98 percent of its state defense order, up from 80 percent last year.

In February, Kremlin Spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Russia would counter any instances of unfair competition in military and technical cooperation from the US and other powers.

Russia’s state arms exporter Rosoboronexport, part of the hi-tech state corporation Rostec, said November last year that it had sold military hardware worth $140 billion over its 17 years of operation.